UUCDC Sermons

When Enough Is Enough

How might we miss out on cultivating gratitude in our lives when we are constantly being bombarded with wants, needs, and products that we “must” have?  How might we counteract the pressures of the capitalistic society that we live in and appreciate more fully how much we really do have?  Join us to explore those things that we can truly be grateful for.

Jo Green currently is the Ministerial Intern at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Cherry Hill, having moved here from California where she spent the last 30 years.  She graduated in 2014 from Starr King School for the Ministry where she was Co-Student Body President.  She is very happy that she survived the winter and has grown to love this area of the country where she's never lived, with or without her beloved palm trees.

Jo Green

Willing To Be Little

Practicing humility in our congregation and in our lives is a way in which we live out our Unitarian Universalist principles. Do we have the courage to live lives of humility?  What would our congregation, and our world, look like if everyone did?

Mark Bernstein is a former member of the Congregational Life Staff of the UUA.  He has been a proud member of UUCDC for 21 years. Mark has recently returned to the field of disabilities where he tries to practice humility every day.

Mark Bernstein

What Saves You

We all have moments of hopelessness or despair.  When you arrive at such moments, what saves you?  Are we saved as a community, or individually?  Have our Universalist roots given us a foundation for salvation, or do we need to look elsewhere?  We will explore the concept of salvation and what it might mean for us as UUs.

Jo Green currently is the Ministerial Intern at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Cherry Hill, having moved here from California where she spent the last 30 years.  She graduated in 2014 from Starr King School for the Ministry where she was Co-Student Body President.  She is very happy that she survived the winter and has grown to love this area of the country where she's never lived, with or without her beloved palm trees.

Jo Green

Tell Your Stories

Each day, we hear messages (both external and internal) that tell us that whatever we're doing it isn't enough. How do we combat those voices? How can telling our stories help us live our lives more authentically?

Chrissy Bushyager is a member of UUCDC and has served as a worship associate for the past two years. A long time ago, she was a marketing manager at a small custom A/V company. Somewhat more recently, she was a counselor and health educator at West Chester University. Currently she divides her time between caring for her two children and writing novels. Who knows what she'll do next. 

Chrissy Bushyager

Fear and Love

Rev. Addae was scheduled to speak this Sunday about fear and its relationship with love, so today’s theme is attributed to her. Fear comes in many different forms: Irrational fears of bridges and spiders, internal fears of commitment or of loneliness, fears that shut us down or fears that motivate us to take action. Fortunately love also comes in many forms: Romantic love first comes to mind, but there’s also a happiness that is a love of life, there’s love fueled by friendship, and love for the passions of our life – may that be a love for work, a love for god, a love for nature.

Riley George is a standout member of our youth group, YUUCKIES, and Worship Associate.  He fillied in for Rev. Addae on short notice admirally. 

Riley George

Playin’ in the Band

To celebrate our community in story and song:  As we head into the summer, we enjoy a wonderful story of togetherness, remind ourselves of the joy of diversity, and commit ourselves to creating a more beautiful world.

Rev. Peter Friedrichs

Rebuilding the Stool by Replacing "Freedom, Reason, and Tolerance"

Since the mid-1900's, the Unitarian "stool" was said to be supported by the three legs of freedom, reason, and tolerance.  Rev. Peter reflects on that tradition and considers what the three legs of a contemporary Unitarian Universalist faith might be.

Rev. Peter Friedrichs

Why Unitarian Univeralism is called the "Living Tradition"

Dan Miyake speaks about why Unitarian Universalism is called the "Living Tradition", and how the denomination, rooted in tradition, embraces the idea that Truth is not sealed in dogma or creed.

Dan Miyake

The Legacy of Michael Servetus

Dan Miyake looks at where we came from as a denomination by exploring the life of Michael Servetus. Servetus was burned at the stake after being branded a heretic by John Calvin. His death served as a catalyst for a call for religious tolerance in Eastern Europe, which eventually spread throughout Western Europe and the New World. Many Unitarian Universalists today consider Servetus to be one of our denomination's proto-founding fathers. He is part of our Unitarian heritage and tradition. What can we learn from Servetus' tragic death that will help us move forward into a better future?
 

Dan Miyake

Who Are You?

Our 7th Principle speaks to the "interdependent web of life of which we are a part." That is, we cannot exist separate from others. As we explore the theme of "Revelation," Dan Miyake explores how our identity is directly informed and influenced by our relationships, and who we are is revealed to us by our interactions with others.

Dan Miyake